Come after me: context

Ecce Agnus Dei - Francis Hoyland

Ecce Agnus Dei – Francis Hoyland

Mark 1:14 After John had been arrested, Jesus came to Galilee proclaiming the gospel of God: 15 “This is the time of fulfillment. The kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the gospel.” 16 As he passed by the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting their nets into the sea; they were fishermen. 17 Jesus said to them, “Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.” 18 Then they abandoned their nets and followed him. 19 He walked along a little farther and saw James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John. They too were in a boat mending their nets. 20 Then he called them. So they left their father Zebedee in the boat along with the hired men and followed him.

The Bigger Picture. The first major section of Mark’s Gospel extends from 1:14 to 3:6, and describes the initial phase of the Galilean ministry. Within this section the evangelist records the calling of the first disciples (1:16–20; 2:14), Jesus’ ministry in and around Capernaum (1:21–34), and a series of controversies (2:1–3:6) which are climaxed by the decision to seek Jesus’ death (3:6). Continue reading

Letter from a Birmingham Jail

Martin_Luther_King_Jr_NYWTS_4On Good Friday, April 12th in 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested with Ralph Abernathy, Fred Shuttlesworth and other marchers in Birmingham, Alabama. At about that same time eight Alabama clergymen, while in some support of the goals, wrote a common letter decrying the methods and tactics of Dr. King and the movement for Civil Rights. Dr. King’s response was completed within days.  My favorite section follows: Continue reading