Mysteries

In Bible studies and classes I have often advised that mysteries of our Faith and sometimes best stated and leave it at the that. Scripture has revealed it, so believe it and try to avoid our natural urge to explain it all in logical details – or even offer analogies. The most likely outcome of your attempt will be one the heresies that the Church has already condemned in the first five centuries.  The very nature of mysteries is that they are mysterious and beyond explanation. Want an good example? Explain the mystery of the Trinity – or rather take a moment and watch this video. Enjoy.

Your epiphany

Today is the Feast of St. Patrick which has optional readings you can find here.

The scene in the gospel is familiar – “oh sure, I’ve heard this before, Jesus is calling his disciples to be fishers of men” – perhaps too familiar. As with most scriptures, there is more than meets the eye.

The account begins with a wide-angle view with Jesus in a natural amphitheater with a large crowd. Having Simon Peter take him in the boat just a little offshore, Jesus can take in the breadth of the crowd as he teaches. There among in the crowd are people who have heard of the great things he has done in Nazareth and Capernaum, as well as Pharisees, scribes and officials from Jerusalem. There too are the ones who will become his disciples and follow him.

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Your response

Today is the Feast of St. Patrick which has optional readings you can find here.

The scene in the gospel is familiar – “oh sure, I’ve heard this before, Jesus is calling his disciples to be fishers of men” – perhaps too familiar. As with most scriptures, there is more than meets the eye.

The account begins with a wide-angle view with Jesus in a natural amphitheater with a large crowd. Having Simon Peter take him in the boat just a little offshore, Jesus can take in the breadth of the crowd as he teaches. There among in the crowd are people who have heard of the great things he has done in Nazareth and Capernaum, as well as Pharisees, scribes and officials from Jerusalem. There too are the ones who will become his disciples and follow him.

Continue reading

A reading for our times

In today first reading for the Memorial of St. Patrick we read “Beloved: Be serious and sober-minded so that you will be able to pray. Above all, let your love for one another be intense, because love covers a multitude of sins. Be hospitable to one another without complaining. As each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of God’s varied grace… whoever serves, let it be with the strength that God supplies, so that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ” (1 Peter 4:7-11)

It struck me that this is a good and appropriate message for these times of life with covid-19. A simple message: be serious and sober-minded. Hopefully the reality of this pandemic is sinking deeper into our consciousness and perspectives. And at the same time, we remember our Christian call to love, serve and pray. Continue reading